Friday, March 13, 2020

Jennifer Crumpley, Author and Children & Family Mental Health Advocate - Episode 2019

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SHOW NOTES

Jennifer Crumpley and Penelope Moore are the authors of Reaching Our Neediest Children: Bringing a Mental Health Program into the Schools, which offers a nuts-and-bolts step-by-step, easy-to-use approach to planning and implementing a free-standing mental health program in a school.
Jennifer's background includes Advanced Clinical Social Work in Family Therapy. She has held leadership positions as an administrator in organizations serving children and families in need of mental health services. Jennifer has also held numerous leadership roles inside service-based organizations, and she served for three years as First Vice-President of the National Association of Social Workers, New York City Chapter. And has been a prolific volunteer in the New York community.

Jennifer is presently an independent practitioner. She maintains a private therapy practice in Staten Island, working with children, adults, and families. She, also, offers sessions providing mindfulness practices, meditation techniques, and pranic healing.

To learn more about Jennifer and her work, visit her website at jennifercrumpley.com.

Click here to find Reaching Our Neediest Children: Bringing a Mental Health Program into the Schools on Amazon

Jennifer’s social sites include:

Facebook
LinkedIn

Click here to connect with Penelope Moore on LinkedIn

15 comments:

  1. Every school system in the United States needs to have this book in their shelf. The authors have written a framework that empowers educators with a step by step guide to not only starting a school mental health program, but insightful ways to implement it and sustain it. I recommend it highly. Purchase your copy today!

    Barbara Rubel, MA, BCETS, DAAETS, Author, But I Didn't Say Goodbye: Helping families after a suicide (3rd ed.) 2020

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    1. Barbara,
      Thank you for you comment. Please share the podcast to your tribe and lets get this great work out there.

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  2. A resourceful and informative interview!

    Reaching Our Neediest Children: Bringing A Mental Health Program Into Schools, would undoubtedly downside and possibly rectify the unnecessary problems related to navigating a bureaucracy, resulting in more effectiveness in providing proper services and treatments for children facing mental health challenges.

    Sanviki Chapman, MA - Transformational Coach,
    Business Consultant

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    1. Thanks for your comment Sanviki. Please share this podcast with your peers.

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  3. This body of work is long overdue. Our children and their teachers have needed this kind of intervention for many years. I recently watched in horror new reports of two separate instances where 6 year old children (one with her hands zip tied) were escorted from their schools by police because their teachers were not equipped with to deal with their behavior. Teachers are trained to teach not to deal with psychological issues that some children present with. Such behavior can be disruptive and frightening for the other children in the classroom. However, such extreme measures as were employed in these instances could be traumatic and possible psychologically damaging to the affected child. A more empathetic approach utilizing the services of a school-based mental health worker could ameliorate such a situation.  Children have the right to be treated with respect in a safe, calming environment without unnecessary drain on the resources of the police department.

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    1. Thank you for your comment and acknowledgement of the importance of Jennifer and Penelope's work.

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  4. Excellent interview! Jennifer is a true gem! In this new decade we must put mental health at the forefront of education. This text needs to get into the hands of superintendents and chancellors. I am inspired to do my part and will get the book for myself and others! Thank you for the inspiration!

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  5. Thank you, Ife, for your comment about the podcast, Jennifer, her & Penelope's book, and the importance of this topic.

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  6. Thank you for this pod cast.So refreshing and encouraging to know a book of this magnitude addressing mental diversity in schools can promote and be a guide to HEALTH.Hopefully the research,love,dedication will jumpstart interest and participation from society in general.Educators should be able to have less of a burden policing students. As mentioned...NYC first lady is envolved in promoting Mental Health thusly this book could be a basis for dererent of mental illness Early .

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  7. I thought this podcast was very insightful and informative. Jennifer did an amazing job of articulating the ever evolving need for mental health programs within the school environment, as well as highlighting how to implement these programs to make the classroom setting better for all.

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    1. Thank you for your comment. Jennifer was great. And this work is so important. Perhasp more so as we navigate mental health issues post COVID-19

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  8. This is good work. I'm glad Ms. Crumpley and her co-author have crafted this manual for our schools. I hope their experience and wisdom will influence school administrators to adopt these strategies and infrastructure for the long-term benefit of their students and families. Thank you for hosting this!

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  9. Thank you for your comment. Our current healthcare crisis, and the impact it is or will have on our school-age children, make this work more important than ever.

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  10. I must mention thanks for sharing such vital information. Acceptable daily exposure

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